The peculiarly English affectation for the Establishment arsehole

Posted: March 12, 2015 in Opinion piece
Tags: , , , , , ,

When I first heard that Jeremy Clarkson had been suspended from Top Gear, I laughed, which would be the first time Clarkson had that effect on me. But, aside from the nauseating spectacle of nearly half a million people voting for someone to be reinstated to a TV show he hadn’t yet been sacked from, for what we hear was an act that would have most of the rest of us dismissed on the spot, I realise that most of my feelings were schadenfreude.

He might be a gobby Establishment bully who galvanises people who should know better to think sneering at people weaker than you is a good thing, but if people really enjoy watching him, it’s not really my business. Besides which I realised a pattern developing. The English particularly have a peculiar obsession with Establishment arseholes.

What do I mean? Just look at the admiration for Margaret Thatcher. Other than her right-to-buy bribe, every policy she enacted crippled working class communities and women in general, yet many from this background and gender speak well of her. The words often used being variations of ‘conviction’; ‘guts’; ‘not afraid to get things done’; ‘powerful’ and the like. They revelled in her antisocial anti-consensual tendencies, even when she was less than ‘politically correct’ with Section 28 and all that. She ignored reasonable objections, and even moved ‘wets’ out of her cabinet in order to railroad her agenda through, which was often confrontational yet lauded.

Boris Johnson is another Establishment windbag who has overseen the social cleansing of London, despite very strong polemic from him suggesting he would never allow this to happen, advocates oligarchs and druglords snapping up property in the Capital and espouses more big business dominance, yet people see him as a lovable performing buffoon who would ‘change politics for the better’.

The most interesting thing about this phenomena are that these icons are always combative, offensive and dismissive of people not like them, yet these are hailed as good points; virtues even. Perhaps most laughable is the fact that none of the examples; Thatcher, Clarkson or Johnson, have ever had to worry about money or the cost of upsetting people, because they were and are deeply entrenched in the Establishment, yet, in a media doublethink of epic proportions, are actually hailed as anti-Establishment mavericks!

Naom Chomsky’s great maxim about a controlling government allowing very lively debate within a very narrow spectrum of opinion is never more apt than in the UK; in England particularly. Judging by coverage, you’d think the only alternative to this right-wing big business hegemony was Katie Hopkins’ latest verbal vomit. Despite clearly being a parody of a right-wing reactionary even the Daily Mail might baulk at, Hopkins is afforded national media column inches the likes of which left-wing academics could only dream of, and so the unthinking imagine the choice is between that daft but not hateful old bigot Clarkson, or the Sun’s poison princess on her lily-pad floating atop her putrid pond of bile.

To use an example of the lack of balance, George Galloway is perhaps the defining left-wing arsehole, a fantastic orator too, yet he rarely appears in any national newspapers, and practically has to photo-bomb to appear on the BBC on a non-Israel topic. When he mouths off and upsets a group of people, the consequences are getting pilloried in the press and attacked in the street, while Clarkson and their ilk relax behind the walls of their mansions, unaffected by their thoughtless jibes at those with a fraction of the money and influence they have.

It does no good to pour scorn on Clarkson or Johnson, so how can we begin to understand the mindset of the people who idolise these Establishment sheep in rabble-rousing wolf fur?

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Comments
  1. richmalpass says:

    I think taking Clarkson out of the public eye is at least a start. Really enjoyed this.

    https://www.the-newshub.com/film-and-tv/jeremy-clarkson-why-he-should-go

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