A dozen differences between a democracy and a dictatorship

Posted: September 12, 2012 in Uncategorized
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1. A dictatorship bans or rigs elections to ensure there is never a ‘new boss’.

A democracy holds corporate-sponsored elections which only allow two potential winners, both lavishly funded by said corporations, thus ensuring the new boss is essentially the same as the old boss.

2. A dictatorship ensures its citizens devote themselves to hard work for minimal pay through use of propaganda lauding those who toil, while disgracing the allegedly idle who can’t. If this fails, the threat of imprisonment or execution awaits.

A democracy ensures its citizens devote themselves to hard work for minimal pay through use of media headlines lauding those who toil, while disgracing the allegedly idle who can’t. If this fails, the threat of imprisonment or destitution awaits.

3. A dictatorship may well execute those who don’t fall into line with regards to slavish obedience or labour obligations, whether they be sick or disabled.

A democracy may well remove financial assistance needed for survival for the sick or disabled, driving some to suicide or death from their conditions exacerbated by extreme stress.

4. A dictatorship will not tolerate dissidence against the regime, crushing protest through military or police brutality, and ensuring no coverage of events are broadcast to the wider population.

A democracy will not tolerate protests against the regime, crushing protest through legislation or police brutality, and ensuring the BBC are persuaded it is in their best interests not to broadcast the protests, or, on a wider scale, focus on any small deviances that may suggest the protestors were simply violent anarchists or criminals.

5. A dictatorship encourages and reinforces wealth inequality through propaganda and fostering desperation while crushing aspiration, ruling with fear while engorging themselves as the chosen elite.

A democracy encourages and reinforces wealth inequality through legislation and regressive taxation, while through a collusive media engineers an austerity narrative in order to cut top-end taxation and increase the pool of desperate unemployed to depress wages and conditions for corporations to take advantage of. Some may even have the gall to further push this agenda with the enforced servitude of the unemployed for no pay, thus reducing paid employment opportunities further. This perfect storm will crush aspiration for those without connections or parents with money, as they rule with fear; gorging themselves on corporate spoils as the chosen elite.

6. A dictatorship routinely preaches discipline and sacrifice while taking bribes from corrupt individuals and companies in exchange for favourable legislation and government contracts, sometimes getting seen or even pictured indulging in extravagant pastimes bankrolled with taxpayers’ money.

A democracy routinely preaches discipline and sacrifice while taking bribes in the form of favours or party funding from corrupt individuals and companies in return for favourable legislation or government contracts, sometimes getting caught bankrolling inappropriate personal expenditure with public expenses money.

7. A dictatorship chiefly runs on nepotism, with power generally being passed from father to son, or brother. Members of the family or extended family and friends are often employed and lavishly rewarded, regardless of competence or principles.

A democracy chiefly runs on cronyism, with power generally being passed from the favoured few to their flunkies, school friends, future business associates, regardless of their education, experience or competence. Their lack of principles is generally regarded as a positive, for it means less chance of institutional corruption being exposed.

8. A dictatorship treats its citizens as either a resource for labour or enforcement. When the labour group begins to rise up, it will happily bribe the enforcement group to oppress their own neighbours. These divisions generally prevent the elite from ever being overthrown.

A democracy treats its citizens as either a resource for labour or enforcement, but also recognises the need for scapegoats, normally in the form of minorities: gays, disabled, human rights activists, immigrants for instance, although bizarrely, two of its favourite minorities are actually majorities, in the form of women and the working classes. The State, through the media, works to split these majorities into interest groups among the remaining minorities. Examples would be pitting the working class against benefit claimants, or women as a whole against single mothers. Preying on the populace’s divisions and prejudices keeps the focus off of the exploitation of the elite, and prevents them being overthrown.

9. A dictatorship uses education to numb young minds and encourage devotion to the State through jingoism.

A democracy uses education to numb young minds through rote learning without proper context. The one form of education that preaches critical learning: University, is now being put out of reach of the very sections of society most likely to want to challenge the system. Jingoism in the tabloid media both justifies corrupt wars, and promotes security ahead of personal freedom.

10. A dictatorship often cites unseen enemies as reason for more and more public money being poured into the military, and civil liberties being eroded. The public are by and large kept oblivious to the reality by carefully controlled media and censorship.

A democracy often cites unseen enemies as reason for more and more public money being poured into military expeditions with dubious motives, and civil liberties being eroded. Censorship such as the closing down of social networks, is justified by ‘security concerns’, though it is never termed as censorship. The general public is largely kept oblivious through the anaesthesia of junk television shows and divisive tabloid headlines.

11. A dictatorship coerces the public into line by propagating anachronistic class fallacies. The elite are where they should be through good breeding and the poor are where they are through genetic inferiority, a situation that they must accept and tolerate, for it can not be any other way.

A democracy coerces the public into line by propagating nonsensical social strata fallacies. The elite are where they should be through hard graft, sacrifice and risk, while the poor are where they are through idleness and refusal to adhere to their economic role. Connections, discrimination, inheritance, privilege and opportunity are words which are not included in this polemic.

12. A dictatorship cultivates the notion that all labour serves the common good through shared sacrifice and taxation, as well as providing enough remuneration for the individual’s basic survival.

A democracy cultivates the notion that all labour serves the individual’s good, and the individual’s good must be relentlessly improved if one is to feel fulfilled. If this is not achieved, said person may be chastised for lacking ambition. Perversely, the idea of a ‘common good’ is relegated to an afterthought, only revisited should someone be accused of surviving on money claimed from the State. The polar paradigms of public and private concerns are inexplicably bolted together in a farcical paradox that even the most ignorant can see through, yet the media reinforces the credibility of said charade still further.

At least, that’s the way I see it.

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